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May 16th, 2007 - ARTIST: RICHARD LAZZARA — LiveJournal
ART GALLERY BOULDER COLORADO USA

shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 08:35
Subject: Technorati Profile (http://technorati.com/claim/rmdcrysu5i)
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shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 19:23
Subject: New Technology For Manufacturing Flexible Solar Cells
Security: Public
It also provides for lightweight and flexible solar cell panels that could find interest in the space, military and recreational markets. For standard applications, the solar cells can also be encapsulated into a more traditional rigid structure.

By being flexible, the solar cells can conform to different surfaces, Eser said, adding this is âœparticularly important for roofing applications for building integration, and for airships and balloons.â

The solar cell sheets are created by depositing copper-indium-gallium-diselinide, which the IEC scientists call CIGS, on a 10-inch wide polymer web, which is then processed into the flexible solar cells. CIGS solar cells are currently the only thin-film technology that has achieved efficiencies comparable to silicon solar cells, presently the standard of the industry.

New Technology For Manufacturing Flexible Solar Cells

Science Daily â” The University of Delaware's Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) has developed new technology for the manufacture of flexible solar cells, which could reduce the costs associated with the use of photovoltaic energy while at the same time expanding possible applications.

It also provides for lightweight and flexible solar cell panels that could find interest in the space, military and recreational markets. For standard applications, the solar cells can also be encapsulated into a more traditional rigid structure.

The solar cell sheets are created by depositing copper-indium-gallium-diselinide, which the IEC scientists call CIGS, on a 10-inch wide polymer web, which is then processed into the flexible solar cells. CIGS solar cells are currently the only thin-film technology that has achieved efficiencies comparable to silicon solar cells, presently the standard of the industry.

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shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 19:53
Subject: Netcraft Toolbar
Security: Public
The Toolbar community is effectively a giant neighbourhood watch scheme, empowering the most alert and most expert members to defend everyone within the community against phishing frauds. Once the first recipients of a phishing mail have reported the target URL, it is blocked for community members as they subsequently access the URL. Widely disseminated attacks (people constructing phishing attacks send literally millions of electronic mails in the expectation that some will reach customers of the bank) simply mean that the phishing attack will be reported and blocked sooner.

Netcraft Toolbar



  • Protect your savings from Phishing attacks.

  • See the hosting location and Risk Rating of every site you visit.

  • Help defend the Internet community from fraudsters.



  • Traps suspicious URLs containing characters which have no common purpose other
    than to deceive.


  • Enforces display of browser navigational controls (toolbar & address bar)
    in all windows, to defend against pop up windows which attempt to hide the
    navigational controls.


  • Clearly displays sites' hosting location, including country, helping you to
    evaluate fraudulent urls (e.g. the real citibank.com or barclays.co.uk sites
    are unlikely to be hosted in the former Soviet Union).

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shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 20:37
Subject: http://www.flektor.com/
Security: Public
tools
clipped from www.flektor.com



Ajax_loader Loading..



Notice from Flektor

If you are Mac user, you can use Flektor too. However, we are still
fixing bugs related to Apple's Safari Browser. If you are Mac User,
you'll need to use the free Firefox browser (http://www.getfirefox.com/) in order to use Flektor

 



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shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 22:18
Subject: Mystery of the Himalayas solved
Security: Public
Scientists can't even be sure how high the land was before India crashed into Asia, obliterating the Tethys Ocean which used to separate them. Like western South America, the coast could have been lined by mountains.Some scientists have even suggested that the rise of the Himalayas could have triggered the Ice Age by increasing the total amount of global rain and removing vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the air.By pushing the Himalayas to their current altitude, more than 8,000m above sea level, and raising the Tibetan plateau to 5,000m, the detachment of the block was responsible for both the monsoon rains that make south Asia so fertile and the Gobi desert in central Asia. Warm winds blowing from the Pacific Ocean cool as they rise over the mountains, releasing the moisture they contain as torrential rains, leaving almost no water to fall on the arid interior of the continent.


Mystery of the Himalayas solved



By Paul Rodgers

The mystery of why the Himalaya mountains and the Tibetan plateau are the highest in the world has at last been answered, with the discovery of a gigantic chunk of rock slowly sinking towards the centre of the Earth.

The discovery of the missing mantle - the cold, heavy rock beneath the crust - was revealed last week by Professor Wang-Ping Chen at the University of Illinois, whose team used more than 200 super-sensitive seismometers strung across the Himalayas, from India deep into Tibet.

Some scientists have even suggested that the rise of the Himalayas could have triggered the Ice Age by increasing the total amount of global rain and removing vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the air.

Scientists can't even be sure how high the land was before India crashed into Asia, obliterating the Tethys Ocean which used to separate them. Like western South America, the coast could have been lined by mountains.

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shankargallery
Date: 2007-05-16 22:37
Subject: Scientists find palm fossils in Ladakh
Security: Public
"The fossils belong to the middle-late Eocene period, anywhere between 45-33 million years ago," SK Paul, a senior scientist with the Dehradun-based Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology said.

The fossils were discovered near Shingbuk, about 12 km from Tsokar which lies in the Indus Suture Zone which divides the Himalayas from the Karakoram Mountains as well as the Tibetan plateau.

The scientists claim that the fossil specimen discovered by them is different from all the known species of Palmacites and have described it as a new species, 'Palmacites tsokarensis', named after the locality from where it was collected.

"Its presence not only indicates that palms were abundant during the middle-late Eocene in the region, but also suggests that the area had not attained as much height as it has today (about 5,000 meters above mean sea level)," he said.

clipped from www.dnaindia.com

NEW DELHI: The frozen deserts of Ladakh once had a coastal environment millions of years ago with palm trees dotting its landscape and scientists have discovered yet another evidence of it in the form of plant fossils.

Palaeobotanists scouring the icy heights of Jammu and Kashmir came across a set of plant fossils near Tsokar in the Eastern Ladakh region a proof of the existence of a coastal environment in the region.

"The fossils belong to the middle-late Eocene period, anywhere between 45-33 million years ago," SK Paul, a senior scientist with the Dehradun-based Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology said.

The fossils were discovered near Shingbuk, about 12 km from Tsokar which lies in the Indus Suture Zone which divides the Himalayas from the Karakoram Mountains as well as the Tibetan plateau.

Scientists find palm fossils in Ladakh
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